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Sharing a Bed? Two Can’t Play at that Game


There are several common co-sleeping issues that women have reported. A recent article from Oprah.com discusses how these problems can be solved and how women can regain their sleep.

Men fall asleep as soon as their heads hit the pillow: John Dittami, an Austria-based sleep researcher and co-author of " Sleeping Better Together, " says it's important for each member of a couple to have their own sleep routine. And, to make sure that your sleep routine doesn’t irritate the other half.

Cuddling makes it difficult to get some shut eye: Dittami says it's very important for couples to spend time together cuddling, touching, snuggling, etc. However, these activities should not be intertwined with sleep. " Sleeping is an individual thing. It’s not a duet, " Dittami said. Set time aside for intimacy before sleep.

Human heater: Men have a higher core body temperature than women. This is due to thyroid function and testosterone levels, Dittami said. Dittami suggests shedding layers at night or creating a cool pillow barrier to block some of the male’s body heat (and sweat). Thermo-regulated products can help keep each member of the couple's body temperature even throughout the night. Protect-A-Bed offers the Luxury Sleep line for optimal comfort.

Sleeps with only a cotton sheet: " Using one blanket for two people just isn't conductive to sleep, " Ditammi said. This makes one aware of their partner’s movement and it amplifies the heat. Dittami found European couples use separate covers at night (which has worked for him and his wife).

Tossing and turning so much it feels like an earthquake: Men and women's nighttime movements are about the same. However, women are much more sensitive to their partner's movement. Again, separate blankets can help and even a new mattress (or two separate ones). Memory-foam mattresses are best for minimizing bounce, according to "Sleeping Better Together".

Snores, clenches his jaw, gnashes his teeth: Persuading a teeth-clencher or gnasher to get a mouth guard can not only help save their teeth and jaw, it can also help the other half sleep. If a spouse is a snorer, encourage them to move to their back or side at the first sign of snoring. Waiting can make it much harder to fall back asleep.

Sleeps through (or pretends to) crying children, mystery noises and potential buglers: A British study ranked sounds most likely to wake people. A crying baby was number one for women, but didn’t even fall into the top 10 for men. Now that women know men aren't just faking it, Dattami suggests seeking helping from a licensed marriage and family therapist. If a child wakes a woman in the middle of the night, waiting until morning to discuss is the best bet. It has been found that men receive less push-back than mothers with a fretful child. Explaining this to him rationally in the morning may help alleviate that night time stress.

For the full article and more tips on sleeping through the night with the man in your life by your side, visit CNN.com.


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